A Small Step in Defense of the Israeli Embassy in Jordan

As many readers may know, on September 9th, after numerous anti-Israeli protests in the area, a mob of Egyptians tore down a protective wall around the Israeli embassy in Cairo using homemade battering rams.  In the early hours of September 10th, they managed to infiltrate the embassy and proceeded to ransack it.

Although the ambassador and most of the staff were not in the embassy at the time of the attack, the Israeli government dispatched an Israeli plane to Cairo to evacuate all members of the diplomatic staff and their families – with the exception of the embassy’s No. 2 – given the rampant anti-Israeli sentiment in the country and the fear of future violence against Israelis.

Meanwhile, the remaining six security personnel in the embassy, whose lives were in serious danger, were fortunately extracted by Egyptian commandos.  Shortly afterward, the mob turned on journalists reporting the event, accusing them of being Israeli spies.

Now, a Facebook event seems to be attempting to stage a Jordanian iteration of the troubling situation in Egypt. The page calls participants to gather in protest in front of the Israeli embassy in Amman, Jordan, in an attempt to remove the Israeli flag over the embassy and generally shut it down.

Although the page does not explicitly call for armed violence against the building, given the context of the current events in Cairo, which a number of the participants discuss on the event’s wall, such a gathering arguably constitutes a credible threat of violence against the Israeli diplomatic mission in Jordan. In fact, in response to rising anti-Israel sentiment of this nature, the Israeli embassy in Amman has been seen beefing up its security.

If you agree that this event endangers Israeli lives, please go to the Facebook page and report it.

UPDATE (9/14): Israel has evacuated its diplomats in Amman in advance of the protest advocated on this Facebook page.

Noa is the editor of the GTJ blog. Any views expressed in this post are her own and do not represent a GTJ institutional stance.